Men's Health Services

310 E. Torrance Ave., P. O. Box 650

Pontiac, Illinois 61764  map

PH. 1-815-844-7174        FAX 1-815-842-2408        TDD 1-800-526-0844

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Colorectal Cancer - What You Need to Know PSA (:60)

This 60 second Public Service Announcement (PSA) is based on the July, 2011 CDC Vital Signs report. Colorectal cancer kills about 50,000 men and women every year. Screening can save lives! Screening can find abnormal growths so they can be removed before turning into cancer, and can find the cancer early, when it's easiest to treat. If you're over 50, talk to your doctor about getting screened for colorectal cancer.  This 60 second Public Service Announcement (PSA) is based on the July, 2011 CDC Vital Signs report. Colorectal cancer kills about 50,000 men and women every year. Screening can save lives! Screening can find abnormal growths so they can be removed before turning into cancer, and can find the cancer early, when it's easiest to treat. If you're over 50, talk to your doctor about getting screened for colorectal cancer. Created: 7/5/2011 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Date Released: 7/5/2011. Series Name: CDC Radio.

Testicular Cancer Information and Self-Exam Proceedure

Prostate Cancer Information Sheet

The Livingston County Health Department provides prostate cancer screenings for $22.00 to men ages 50 to 64, or men ages 40 to 49 who have a family history of prostate cancer. For complete information click on Wellness Clinics.

Screenings are available by appointment at the Health Department by calling 815-844-7174.

PSA only tests ($22 fee) will be conducted throughout the year by appointment, or may be included in a Wellness Clinic visit (fee total of $50).

 

Data from the 2007 Illinois Cancer Registry indicates that Livingston County had a slightly higher incidence rate of prostate cancer than the State of Illinois, (Livingston County 159 vs. Illinois 157).

 

Testicular cancer incidence rates in Livingston County increased from 1988 - 2003. According to the Illinois Cancer Registry, the five-year incidence rate for testicular cancer in Livingston County for 1988-1992 was 2.8, for 1993-1997 the rate increased to 5.6, and for 1998-2002 the rate jumped to 10.2.  For 2003-2007 the rate dropped to 9.8. For Illinois the 2003 -2007 rate was just 5.2. Testicular cancer is the most common form of cancer found in men age 15-35. However, testicular cancer detected and treated in Stage I is 95-100% curable, and in Stage II is 90+% curable. At Stage III cure rates drop to 70% (National Cancer Institute).

 

Attention Men: PSA Screening Could Save Your Life

 

I recently heard on the news that PSA testing is often inaccurate, missing cancers. Why should I get this test done?

 

PSA testing isnít perfect, but no screening test is. It is possible to get either a false-positive or false negative result. However, it is one of the best tools currently available to help detect potential prostate problems. The other important tool to help your doctor in detecting problems is the digital rectal exam (DRE). Both the PSA and DRE should be part of a screening for prostate cancer.

 

What is the digital rectal exam?  

In a digital rectal exam, the doctor inserts a lubricated, gloved finger into the rectum and feels the prostate through the rectal wall to check for hard or lumpy areas.  

 

Prostate cancer fact:  Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men and the second leading cause of cancer death.  Since prostate cancer usually has no symptoms, it is important for men to begin having annual PSA (prostate-specific antigen) blood testing at age 50.  Men who have a family history of prostate cancer should begin testing at age 40.

PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen) is a simple blood test used to detect possible prostate cancer in men 50 years of age or older.  You may want to have this test performed at an earlier age if you have a close family member with prostate cancer or if you are African-American.

In 2000 there were 180,400 new cases of prostate cancer and 31,900 deaths due to this disease.

About 1 out of 5 men will develop prostate cancer in their lifetime.

What is the prostate?

It is a walnut sized gland in men located just below your bladder.  Its function is to provide a thick fluid for semen production.

Why should you have a PSA screening performed?

Often, early stages of prostate cancer have no signs or symptoms associated with them, yet early detection and treatment leads to a higher survival rate.

How is the screening performed?       

We take a small sample of blood from you and send it to our lab to measure the PSA level.  Within a week to 10 days you will receive the results of your test in the mail, along with an explanation and possibly further instructions.

How often should I have this test done?

The American Cancer society recommends that men have this performed yearly beginning at the age of 50.

Why should this be done yearly?

Having this test done yearly allows your doctor to note if there are dramatic increases in your PSA level which need to be further addressed. Of note, PSA levels differ according to age and tend to rise gradually in men over the age of 60.

What if my level is abnormal?

If your PSA level is greater than the normal range for your age group, you will need to set up an appointment with your regular physician for follow-up study.

Are there other reasons, besides prostate cancer, that my PSA level may be increased?

Yes. An enlarged prostate gland, an infected or inflamed prostate, biopsy or operation on the prostate, or recent sexual activity may all increase levels of PSA in your blood.  Again, it is important for you to follow up with a physician if your level is abnormal for any reason.

Additional information on Prostate Cancer Symptoms and Diagnosis is available at this link: http://nihseniorhealth.gov/prostatecancer/symptomsanddiagnosis/06.html